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Open source Windows Lasso

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The good people at LogLogic have made the obvious start-up move by releasing an open source package that supports their technology to developers.

LogLogic's team has refined the already open source Snare agents to create a centralized log management package for Windows servers called Project Lasso. The new software is being billed as a GPLed alternative to Microsoft's standard event collection products.

"Project Lasso broadens Windows administrators and manager’s options by enabling them to capture all windows event logs on a central server using next generation transport and without deploying agents,’ LogLogic vice president of product management Dominique Levin said.

LogLogic already sells server appliances and software that give customers sophisticated ways of collecting and analyzing their log data. The company pitches its products as key to ensuring compliance with regulatory policies and a means of learning more about your business and customer behavior. Project Lasso fits under this umbrella and could be used by third-parties to create complementary software.

Without question, the real plus behind Project Lasso is that it doesn't require a customer to mess around with agents. The software runs on a single server and can track Windows and application event logs. The audit departments at customers will see user activity such as when someone accessed or modified a file or application.

LogLogic is looking to release more tools along these lines in the coming months.

Overall, LogLogic has been pushing the idea that the combination of cheaper disk storage and improved analysis tools has made it practical to store all of your log files. The company specializes in helping customers sort through reams of data to look for patterns or to make sure employees are doing what they're supposed to.

Offering up an open source package is a clear attempt to increase developer and customer awareness of the log play.

The new Project Lasso tool is available for download here. ®

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