Feeds

UK.gov pioneers secure Linux to contain breaches

Return of the Mac

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Infosec IBM is working with the Cabinet Office to demonstrate one of the first mainstream Mandatory Access Control (MAC) environments. The MAC approach is designed to contain the impact of security breaches, a feature that will give government departments greater confidence in extending government services to the public over the net. The design for the system, which IBM is putting together with its partners Tresys Technology and Belmin Group, is based upon Security Enhanced Linux (SELinux) and IBM WebSphere.

Instead of relying on traditional gateway security technologies such as firewalls, Mandatory Access Control seeks to make sure rogue applications or malicious users are automatically contained and cannot cause damage beyond their immediate context. The proof of concept is planned to go live in May 2006, at County Durham and Darlington Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, and will focus on enabling secure access to an invoicing service, called Belmin’s ARIES (automated reconciliation and invoicing efficiency savings) service, that will replace an existing manual system.

"We consider MAC to be a key enabling technology to aid government and businesses alike in being confident they can deliver more services, more quickly, and with better function, without compromising security," commented Steve Marsh, director at the Central Sponsor for Information Assurance (CSIA).

Over time, the MAC approach might be extended to other software environments, according to IBM. "What we've demonstrated here with WebSphere and SELinux can be repeated with other software such as DB2 and business applications. In other words through, with the use of this technology, any organisation will have the ability to contain hackers, provide the necessary confinement for its applications, and minimise damage to the enterprise", said Doc Shankar, world wide Linux security lead for IBM.

IBM unveiled the project during a presentation at the Infosecurity conference in London on Wednesday. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
Hackers thrash Bash Shellshock bug: World races to cover hole
Update your gear now to avoid early attacks hitting the web
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Who.is does the Harlem Shake
Blame it on LOLing XSS terroristas
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.