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Early days of dial-up hacking recalled

Nostalgia ain't what it used to be

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Infosec blog The last day of Infosec brought nostalgia for the old days of hacking. Robert Schifreen, the ex-hacker and author famous for breaking into Prince Phillips' Prestel account 20 odd years ago, recalled a more innocent age during his stint chairing a hackers panel.

"You didn't have flat rate hacking before the internet. It was all dial-up and hacking attacks tending to occur after 6pm when cheap rate began. At that time, admins were back watching Neighbours or the Magic Roundabout."

Alleged Pentagon hacker Gary McKinnon by contrast said it was failure to take into account time differences that ultimately led to his undoing. McKinnon used a tool called RemotelyAnywhere. His use of the software during office hours betrayed his presence on a NASA system when someone noticed the mouse control moving without anyone being at a machine.

"Users should educate their staff to use strong passwords and turn off machines. It sounds silly but this is what let me in," McKinnon said.

Shake that booty

Infosec, thankfully, isn't all work so we spent many enjoyable hours in the Hand and Flower pub on Hammersmith Road winding down after a busy day's work. If only they employed more staff during the show.

Eugene Kaspersky shakes his stuff

Some like to party on even longer than most and none more so than Eugene Kaspersky, who hosted hackers and bellydancers in the Number 3 bar in Mayfair. Kaspersky Labs, whose previous Infosec gigs included a party in a reception suite at Stamford Bridge once again managed to throw the best party we attended. ®

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