Feeds

Rivals want to invest in Australia's broadband network

What's that, Skippy? Telstra not happy?

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Some of Australia's top telecoms companies want to club together with incumbent Telstra to invest in upgrading the nation's broadband network.

The telcos - Internode, Macquarie, Optus, PowerTel, Primus, Soul and TransACT - believe proposals put forward by Australia's dominant telco are bad news for consumers and competitors.

In a nutshell, Telstra's plans to invest in five major cities serving some four million homes and businesses. But rivals say this will "divide Australia into the digital haves and have-nots," with less than half of all phone lines able to receive the new high speed services.

Worse still, Telstra also wants to be given something in return for its investment and rivals are concerned that this will mean restricting competition and higher prices for end users.

Instead, rival operators are putting together a plan that would pool resources and provide a "collective investment in an open access network" that could be used by all broadband providers.

"Under our proposal, Telstra would be joined by other telcos and internet service providers in making the necessary investment to upgrade the existing copper local loop into a high bandwidth fibre to the node network," said David Tudehope, chief exec of Macquarie Telecom.

"This approach will deliver high speed broadband services to more Australians, more quickly, than if the new network was a Telstra monopoly."

Michael Simmons, boss of Soul, said: "Telstra has offered Australia a false choice: a high speed broadband network owned by a monopoly provider; or preservation of the existing market structure involving several competitors, but with no increase in broadband speeds."

Instead, the rival operators that have long-battled with Telstra for access to its network say their proposal will deliver improved broadband competition, better prices and product innovation tanks to the creation of a "genuinely national, open and competitive broadband network".

The Government is understood to be keen to hear further details of the plans, but Telstra has already rubbished the proposals.

A spokesman for the telco told The Age that the proposals were a "self-serving, pickpocket plan to rip off Telstra's shareholders and taxpayers. What they are doing is becoming the ultimate parasite on Telstra's network." ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.