Feeds

Adult film industry trials burnable content

Pay to groan

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

NSFW A leading US provider of hard-core porn plans to sell downloadable films that customers can turn into DVDs and watch on their TVs. Vivid reckons the approach will increase online sales by attracting punters who'd rather knock one off while watching TV rather than staring at a computer screen.

Piracy fears and the possibility of alienating existing sales channels have caused both porn producers and mainstream Hollywood studios to be reluctant about testing "burnable" films. Attitudes are changing, however, and as with many new areas of technology, such as streaming media and home video, the adult entertainment industry is once again at the forefront of adopting new technology.

Vivid plans to begin selling burnable movies through online distribution service CinemaNow from 8 May. CinemaNow began offering a selection of adult films as streaming media downloads late last year that incorporated features such as pay-per-minute movie rentals. The evolution of this service will see around 30 Vivid titles offered at $19.95 a throw. The downloads will include all the material that features on a DVD, encoded using copy-protection technology in order to deter piracy.

Mainstream Hollywood is also trialling the technology. Earlier this month, a number of studios agreed to sell films online through CinemaNow and rival service Movielink. Consumers can download and view films including King Kong and Brokeback Mountain using the service. But unlike Vivid's offering, they can't burn content onto DVDs in a form that can be viewed on TV.

Other producers of high-quality smut, such as Red Light District, plan to introduce a similar service. Skin flick studios are interested in pushing online distribution because it helps remove the stigma of buying DVDs from back street stores, while reducing the distribution costs of producers. DVDs account for around 34 per cent of sales in the adult entertainment industry, the global revenue of which hit an estimated $12.6bn last year. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!
Grim diversity numbers dumped alongside Facebook earnings
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Bose says today IS F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.