Feeds

China bites back in transplant trade scandal

Prisoners parts? Says Hu?

Intelligent flash storage arrays

A growing firestorm surrounds China's reported selling of organs harvested from prisoners it puts to death. Today China fired back at the widely reported statement by The British Transplantation Society criticising it for taking organs from its many executed prisoners without permission.

Speaking at a news conference Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang sniped: "I want to remind this organization not to forget that a few years ago this kind of thing happened in Britain." Qin did not detail what he meant by this.

The British Transplantation Society (BTS) chose the visit of Chinese president Hu to the US to issue a strong statement on the secretive trade.

They said organs are bought and sold in a racket that involves transplant centres, patients, the authorities and the judiciary responsible for the prisoners. Adding the doctors' voices to that of human rights groups, BTS Ethics Chairman Stephen Wigmore said: “BTS condemns unreservedly any activity that transgresses an individual's human rights or involves the coercion of an individual to become an organ donor.”

Chinese officials deny the allegations of coercion. They say organs from executed prisoners have sometimes been used, but only with prior permission and in a very few cases. In March Qin said: "It is a complete fabrication, a lie or slander to say that China forcibly takes organs from the people given the death penalty for the purpose of transplanting them.”

The BTS reckons an “the accumulating body of evidence” says otherwise.

Bush is being urged to put pressure on Chinese President Hu when they meet today in Washington. A subcommittee of the House International Relations Committee heard evidence about the transplant organ trade Wednesday.

Beijing has promised to outlaw the cash trade in organs from July. It says written consent will now always be required from donors.®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
What's that STINK? Rosetta probe shoves nose under comet's tail
Rotten eggs, horse dung and almonds – yuck
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
Kip Thorne explains how he created the black hole for Interstellar
Movie special effects project spawns academic papers on gravitational lensing
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.