Feeds

China bites back in transplant trade scandal

Prisoners parts? Says Hu?

The next step in data security

A growing firestorm surrounds China's reported selling of organs harvested from prisoners it puts to death. Today China fired back at the widely reported statement by The British Transplantation Society criticising it for taking organs from its many executed prisoners without permission.

Speaking at a news conference Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang sniped: "I want to remind this organization not to forget that a few years ago this kind of thing happened in Britain." Qin did not detail what he meant by this.

The British Transplantation Society (BTS) chose the visit of Chinese president Hu to the US to issue a strong statement on the secretive trade.

They said organs are bought and sold in a racket that involves transplant centres, patients, the authorities and the judiciary responsible for the prisoners. Adding the doctors' voices to that of human rights groups, BTS Ethics Chairman Stephen Wigmore said: “BTS condemns unreservedly any activity that transgresses an individual's human rights or involves the coercion of an individual to become an organ donor.”

Chinese officials deny the allegations of coercion. They say organs from executed prisoners have sometimes been used, but only with prior permission and in a very few cases. In March Qin said: "It is a complete fabrication, a lie or slander to say that China forcibly takes organs from the people given the death penalty for the purpose of transplanting them.”

The BTS reckons an “the accumulating body of evidence” says otherwise.

Bush is being urged to put pressure on Chinese President Hu when they meet today in Washington. A subcommittee of the House International Relations Committee heard evidence about the transplant organ trade Wednesday.

Beijing has promised to outlaw the cash trade in organs from July. It says written consent will now always be required from donors.®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Bacon-related medical breakthrough wins Ig Nobel prize
Is there ANYTHING cured pork can't do?
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.