Feeds

Google receives 'voice search' patent

More search-by-voice than American Idol

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Google is back in the news again after it emerged that the firm recently filed a patent for technology which could lead to voice-assisted search.

Patent no 7027987, which was published on the US Patent and Trademark Office website on Tuesday, is for a "voice interface for a search engine".

The patent describes the interface as "a system (that) provides search results from a voice search query. The system receives a voice search query from a user, derives one or more recognition hypotheses, each being associated with a weight, from the voice search query, and constructs a weighted boolean query using the recognition hypotheses. The system then provides the weighted boolean query to a search system and provides the results of the search system to a user."

In plain English this simply means that rather than receiving text-based queries from users, Google's search engine would receive voice-activated search queries instead.

Many analysts believe that the recently filed patent could be the firm's first step towards introducing technology which would allow users to search the internet via voice. However, there's no evidence to suggest that the search engine giant is about to unveil such a service anytime soon.

Although Google is the undisputed top-dog when it comes to text-based internet searches, it has sought to build on its popularity by branching out into other areas over the past few years. In addition to introducing a number of related services such as Google Maps, it has also experimented with voice-based internet searches in the past. In fact, a demo of a service known as "Google Voice Search" has been up on the firm's Google Labs website for sometime now although it isn't accessible at present.

The patent was filed by Google co-founder Sergey Brin along with three associates. Two of the other named inventors in the patent are Alexander Franz and Brian Milch, who co-authored an academic paper, entitled "Searching the Web by Voice" back in 2002.

© ENN

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Bono apologises for iTunes album dump
Megalomania, generosity and FEAR of irrelevance drove group to Apple deal
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.