Feeds

Microsoft flips Atlas a second time

Scrubs cleaner

Boost IT visibility and business value

Microsoft has made its latest thrust into the internet futurama that is Web 2.0, by issuing a second batch of pre-release code for its Atlas technology along with a toolkit for Visual Studio developers to build Atlas controls.

Atlas is Microsoft's client and server framework intended for developers constructing applications using Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) with ASP.NET.

Microsoft launched its first pre-release, community technology preview (CTP) of Atlas in March. The company has this week updated that with a second CTP, fixing bugs in its planned gadgets - Microsoft's equivalent of widgets, used to access online services outside of the browser, that are found in Apple's OS X Tiger. Microsoft has disabled cross-domain access to DataService services by default with its bug fix.

As with last month's CTP, this latest release comes with Microsoft's by-now familiar Go Live licenses, enabling developers to build real-world applications using the code but without the safety net of protection from Microsoft should things go wrong.

Microsoft is also releasing an Atlas Control Toolkit for Visual Studio developers to build client-side controls for consumption by ASP.NET on the server. The toolkit includes source code and documentation. Additionally, Microsoft said it planned to release the source code as a Shared Source project, allowing developers from Microsoft and other "selected" community members to contribute code back to the code base.

AJAX is the cause celeb - some would say great enabler/badger - of Web 2.0. The technology is being seized upon by many who hope to build on-line applications whose interfaces offer the level of functionality found on the desktop. Arguably AJAX's biggest driving force in the industry has become Google.

While AJAX offers great promise on a functional level, it's not necessarily that easy to use when building applications. Adding to the confusion are at least 19 AJAX and AJAX-related frameworks, all created with the purpose of providing developers with an outline of how to build distributed applications and online services using JavaScript and XML.

Microsoft is adding to the mix with Atlas, only it is bending AJAX to Windows on the client and its web/server-side ASP.NET rival to JavaServer Pages (JSP) technology. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?