Feeds

Oracle buys Portal Software

Pays cash and everything...

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Oracle is paying $220m in cash for Portal Software which makes billing and "revenue management" software.

The database giant is paying $4.90 a share or about $220m.

Charles Phillips, president at Oracle, said the combined firm offered the first end-to-end software suite for the communications industry.

Portal Software offers billing software which runs on Oracle databases. The company's staff will form a communications business unit at Oracle led by current VP of worldwide sales Bhaskar Gorti and Dave Labuda, Portal's founder, will become the unit's CTO.

Oracle hopes the combination of itself, for databases, Siebel, for CRM and now Portal for billing will sell well to communications and media companies.

In the last year or so Oracle has bought a bunch firms including: Retek, single sign-on firm Oblix, database maker TimesTen, database rival Siebel and Finnish developer InnoBase.

The takeover, subject to the usual regulatory approval, should close in June.

More details from Oracle here.®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?