Feeds

Opteron carries AMD to banner Q1

Forgetting memory

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

Freed of a money-losing memory business, AMD posted clean first quarter results that reflected gains in the server, desktop and mobile processor markets.

AMD reported first quarter revenue of $1.33bn and a profit of $185m. Those figures compare with revenue of $780m and income of $64m in the same period last year. AMD enjoyed increased sales across the board and noted particular success with its Opteron and Turion processors.

"Servers continued to be the leader here followed by mobile," said Henri Richard, an EVP with AMD.

AMD had "triple-digit growth" year-over-year with the Opteron server chip, Richard said.

The AMD results mentioned earlier from last year's first quarter exclude the memory business that has been spun off as Spansion. The money-losing memory unit weighed on AMD's improving processor results in recent quarters.

Analysts were impressed with AMD's quarter and told executives exactly that during a conference call.

"Congratulations on a great quarter," said Punk, Ziegel & Co. analyst JoAnne Feeney. The fickle Feeney was less thrilled last month when she downgraded AMD.

It always makes us nervous when the analysts cheer a company during these post results conference calls, but it seems to make the Wall Street crowd feel productive.

Much of the analyst attention also focused on how AMD will respond to an improved product lineup from Intel that will arrive in the second half of the year.

"Our competitor's future roadmap has gotten a lot of attention lately," said Dirk Meyer, the Prez and COO at AMD. "Our sales and marketing teams have been very focused on selling our current products."

Once done slapping Intel around, Meyer admitted that AMD expects a more even playing field in the coming months from a processor performance point of view.

AMD has enjoyed about a two-year performance edge over Intel on the server processor front, which has let it secure customers such as IBM, HP and Sun Microsystems.

The company expects second quarter sales to rise 65 per cent year-over-year. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.