Feeds

Faults system blamed for Wanadoo LLU woes

Your fault, their fault, the fault system's fault...

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Wanadoo UK's faults system is being blamed for leaving some of its customers without broadband for weeks on end. The ISP is currently moving thousands of users to its local loop unbundling (LLU) network, but it admits some migrations are not going ahead as planned.

As a result, Wanadoo customers report being left without broadband for weeks on end with the ISP's customer support services failing to provide any meaningful help.

Now, sources have told El Reg that the problem is due to Wanadoo's fault diagnosis system, which is supposed to keep track of problems when cutomers are moved to the new LLU network. Insiders say software errors are causing customer reports to get "stuck" in the system.

The problem is made worse because these faults are piling up, making a massive backlog that Wanadoo is struggling to clear. Some customers have complained they have been without broadband for almost three months while still paying for the service.

When asked to comment, a spokeswoman for Wanadoo dodged questions about the ISP's faults system. Instead she told us: "As we have said before, LLU is a very complex technology and a number of things can go wrong - so if a very large number of customers are being migrated, a very few might experience problems. The fact remains that the very vast majority of Wanadoo LLU customers have not had any issues at all."

Despite Wanadoo's spin, this has failed to prevent punters from taking direct action to air their grievances. Last week, Kevin Ellis from London launched an online forum - Wanadoo Problems - to highlight the plight of broadband users left in the dark by the ISP. Kevin has been without broadband now for eight weeks and has spent around £35 on calls to Wanadoo's helpline trying and get his broadband reactivated.

"I despair with them," he told us. "I've been told one thing and then another. They're not helping customers in the slightest. It's cost me a fortune in calls to support." ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins
We don't need no steenkin' TCP/IP retransmission and the congestion it causes
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.