Feeds

Sun sends SPARC team members packing

Blasts Jupiter out of orbit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Sun Microsystems has laid off seven per cent of its SPARC processor and server group, as it pares back projects in an effort to save costs.

Most of the workers were officially notified of the cuts yesterday, and word of the layoffs did not come as a surprise. Sun had a large number of SPARC research and development projects underway, as it looked for ways to complement its UltraSPARC T1 line and upcoming Rock family of processors. Many staffers suspected their projects might be cancelled, according to sources, and have long been shopping for new jobs.

As we reported in an exclusive last month, one of these projects was code-named Jupiter, which was meant to serve as a networking and security co-processor for Rock chips. The Jupiter project has been cancelled, and the team laid off this week, sources told El Reg.

Sun, however, characterized any roadmap changes as insignificant.

"The Scalable Systems Group management team worked hard to minimize the number of terminations by closing open requisitions, re-allocating resources and increasing organizational efficiency where possible," Sun said in a statement. "Unfortunately the effort has resulted in notifications to some of SSG's employees - approximately 200.

"Sun's overall strategy remains the same and our product roadmap is as strong as it has ever been with no significant changes."

Sun has long been reluctant to trim payrolls despite Wall Street's constant urging to do so. The company has hovered just below the break even point for a few quarters. Layoffs could help kick it into the black.

Not too long ago, Sun executives bragged that they would hire any gifted chip engineers on the market. Such braggadocio seems to have faded with Opteron taking on more importance for Sun's future plans. Sun currently shares SPARC costs with Fujitsu.

Our sources indicate that Sun has decided to center its resources around the core UltraSPARC T1 and Rock offerings rather than push money and people onto fringe products as well. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
'Internet Freedom Panel' to keep web overlord ICANN out of Russian hands – new proposal
Come back with our internet! cries Republican drawing up bill
What a Mesa: Apple vows to re-use titsup GT sapphire glass plant
Commits to American manufacturing ... of secret tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?