Feeds

EU questions Spain's Intel love

Dónde Está x86?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The European Commission has given Spain a spanking over its apparent EU law-breaking preference for Intel chips.

The EC this week requested information from Spanish officials about the country's computer buying processes. Close to twenty-five purchase requests from central, regional and local Spanish bodies have revealed demands that PCs, laptops and servers contain Intel-branded chips running at specific clock-rates. Investigating EC officials suspect such policies may violate EU directives for open competition.

"Under the EU public procurement rules, contracting authorities may refer to a brand name to describe a product only when there are no other possible descriptions that are both sufficiently precise and intelligible to potential tenderers," the EC said in a statement. "In this case, however, the microprocessors may be described in a precise and intelligible manner using references such as the type of the microprocessor, and its required performance."

"The use of a minimum clock-rate is discriminatory in relation to certain brands of microprocessors whose performance can only be appraised fairly by adding the IPC (Instructions executed Per Clock) to the clock-rate."

In particular, the EC seems upset with the "Intel-branded" and "Intel or equivalent" language used by Spanish officials. It's common these days for corporate and government buyers to talk about x86 chips - a designation which includes products from Intel, AMD and others.

Spain joins France, Germany, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden as countries that have received letters from the EU about this issue.

Intel and AMD are in the midst of another, ongoing anti-trust battle. AMD argues that Intel has boxed it out of the PC and server markets unfairly. Intel contends that it competes fiercely but fairly. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.