Feeds

Pirate CD 'kingpins' cop a plea

Latino music and Symantec counterfeit operation busted

Security for virtualized datacentres

A pair of California men pleaded guilty this week to what prosecutors describe as the largest CD manufacturing piracy scheme ever uncovered in the US. Ye Teng Wen (AKA Michael Wen), 29 and Hao He (AKA Kevin He), 30, both of Union City, California admitted the mass production of nearly 200,000 pirated music and software CDs. The dynamic duo each confessed to five criminal counts including criminal copyright infringement and trafficking in counterfeit labels as part of a plea-bargaining agreement.

Ye and Hao were arrested after agents seized 500,000 pirated music, software, and movie CDs, and DVD and more than 5,500 stampers during raids of 13 locations in California and Texas as part of Operation Remaster last October. Many of the counterfeit software CDs the pair produced included counterfeit anti-piracy seals and artwork to make the goods appear genuine. Latino artists and Symantec security software were the principal targets of the pair's criminal activities.

In a plea agreement, the defendants admitted that between September 2004 until they were busted in October 2005, they used replication and silk screening machines at Media Art Technology, in Hayward and Union City, California, for the mass reproduction of copyrighted software and music. Technology, which has been seized, allowed them to turn their software counterfeiting business into a mass production enterprise. Ye and Hao admitted to serving as manufacturers in a much larger criminal conspiracy involving brokers, replicators, assemblers, packagers, printers, distributors and retailers across the US.

Ye and Hao each face up to five years imprisonment and a $250,000 fine on each count at a sentencing hearing before US District Judge Ronald Whyte on 16 October. A third defendant, Yaobin Zhai, 33, of Fremont, California is due to be summoned into court to answer similar charges on 22 May. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Forget silly privacy worries - help biometrics firms make MILLIONS
Beancounter reckons dabs-scanning tech is the next big moneypit
Microsoft's Office Delve wants work to be more like being on Facebook
Office Graph, social features for Office 365 going public
Alibaba swings a large one with STONKING IPO legal bills
Chinese e-commerce beast searches for $21bn from investors
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
EMC has nothing to say on VMware sale plan
Rumour and counter-rumour swirl around Wall Street
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.