Feeds

Brummies snub privatisation

Council workers reject TUPE

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Less than 10 Birmingham City Council staff have taken up an offer to join the local authority's private sector partnership as full employees.

Around 500 others turned up their noses at protections offered to them under TUPE (Transfer of Undertakings - Protection of Employment Regulations), opting instead for secondment as council employees under a £475m outsourcing deal with Capita.

"Staff had the choice under law to TUPE if they wished to. The latest figure is that less then 10 exercised that choice," said Glynn Evans, who was director of business solutions and IT at the council until the Capita deal was struck at the weekend.

Balgit Kundi, chairman of the staff representative group that consulted with Birmingham over the deal, said: "It was a choice that staff preferred because it allowed employees of Birmingham City Council to retain their terms and conditions."

TUPE regulations are being updated today, 6 April, and will include staff transferred as part of an outsourcing deal. They also require companies transferring staff to provide the receiving company with information about them.

Yet the new protections were still not enough for city staff.

"With TUPE, while your terms and conditions are protected, they can be changed after a certain period of time," Kundi said.

Secondments were also taken in preference to TUPE transfers by staff affected by similar deals in Liverpool and Suffolk, but none on this scale, said Evans.

Evans promised that staff kept on Birmingham's payroll would not face compulsory redundancy, but did say some might have to be retrained and reposted.

Birmingham staff will be given a chance to change their mind in July.

However, as TUPE protections only apply to staff if they are caught at the point of transfer, any who change their mind will not be given statutory protection. The council has promised contracts that maintain equivalent conditions, but these might not stand up in a tribunal. ®

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know
What do you mean, we've ditched Redmond in favour of IBM?!
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.