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Samsung SGH-Z320i 3G i-mode mobile phone

O2's first 3G i-mode combi phone

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Review Chelsea FC seems hell bent on alienating the entire world, but new sponsor Samsung has gone for a far more inclusive approach with the first 3G and i-mode combination handset, now ready for O2's UK customers.

samsung sgh-z320i 3g i-mode phone

From a very young age I was always told that putting all your eggs in one basket was a bad thing - so how come this smart little Samsung phone is so enticing? It's the first device to offer both 3G and i-mode connectivity, so if you want rapid internet access on the move it looks like the ideal phone.

Well, it does as long as you want to use the impressive - but fairly limited - selection of content providers available on i-mode, and are willing to view all the videos and content you access on the relatively small 1.9in screen.

But that's partly the point of the Z320i, because considering all the connection options this handset has to offer - to which you can add quad-band functionality and Bluetooth - it's small and very neatly put together. It may not be as slim as the LG U880 or Razr V3x, but with its neat sliding mechanism and short stature it's more pocketable than most 3G handsets.

It also manages to squeeze in a 1.3 megapixel camera and there's the option of video calling too - there's two cameras on board, an option I prefer to the single swivelling lens provided by other 3G handsets.

There are some downsides, though, the main one being the lack of any kind of memory expansion options. Okay, so the 100MB of installed memory is reasonably healthy, but if you are thinking of downloading video or music for the built-in MP3 player then you're going to use that up quickly. And why can't handset makers put standard headphone sockets on their phones? At least that way they are easy to upgrade and replace.

Still, these are relatively minor points, and in action the 95g, 9.7 x 4.8 x 2.3cm Z320i is an excellent little phone. The menu system is very user-friendly, and it performs very well in the all-important areas of voice calling and internet browsing.

Verdict

The best of both worlds in a very friendly handset. What's not to like?

Review by
Pocket-Lint.co.uk

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

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Samsung SGH-Z320i 3G i-mode mobile phone

The first 3G i-mode combi phone, the Z320i offers great connectivity in a small, chic package...
Price: From free (monthly contract) or £230 (pay-as-you-go) RRP

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