Feeds

Negroponte tells software industry to slim down

That includes you, Gates

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Nicholas Negroponte has criticized the software industry, including those building Linux, for churning out bloatware that slows down even the fastest PCs.

Negroponte, chairman of the One Laptop Per Child charity and co-founder of the MIT Media Laboratory, told LinuxWorld on Tuesday we have reached a point where each new release of software is successively worse than the one before it.

"In my opinion, every single new release of software is distinctly worse than the previous one. I just got the fastest laptop on the planet, it is the slowest, most unreliable machine I have ever had in my life," Negroponte said.

"People aren't thinking about small, fast, thin systems. Suddenly it's like a very fat person [who] uses most of the energy to move the fat. And Linux is no exception. Linux has gotten fat, too."

Negroponte blamed vendors for adding too many features to the software without thinking about the impact they would have on a PCs' performance.

Negroponte's charity is building a $100, Linux-based PC targeting children in developing nations - the goal is to ship up to 10m of the low-powered devices, which will get their energy from cranking a wind-up lever. That concept has been lambasted by Microsoft chief software architect Bill Gates who told the Negroponte demographic, some of who lack electricity or broadband connection, to "get a decent computer" instead.

Gates also helpfully explained it was software, in addition to network connectivity, that was the most expensive factor when manufacturing PCs. "Hardware is a small part of the cost," Gates told last month's Government Leaders' Forum in Washington.

In an apparent response to Gates and the power-hungry nature of Windows, Negroponte told LinuxWorld he'd joked for years how each time Intel releases a faster processor, Windows would gobble up even more of the hardware's power.

"Fifteen or 20 years ago I used to joke, you know what, every time Andy [Grove] makes a faster processor, Bill [Gates] uses more of it," he said. ®

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?
Google's app permissions far too lax – security firm survey
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
OpenWRT gets native IPv6 slurping in major refresh
Also faster init and a new packages system
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.