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PowerColor X1900XT tiny

PowerColor X1900 XT 512MB

PowerColour brings a price-competitive ATI Radeon X1900 XT to the market

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Review It's generally a waste of a lot of money to go for a top-of-the-range card from any manufacturer. Unless you really, really need that extra little bit of performance, it makes more financial sense to go for the next card down. This is especially the case with ATI's X1900 XT and X1900 XTX - the XTX's performance advantage over the XT simply isn't enough to justify its higher price...

PowerColor X1900XT

Indeed, considering that the X1900 XT runs neck and neck with Nvidia's GeForce 7900 GTX, costs less and supports 512MB of graphics memory, it looks like something of a bargain card in this end of the market...

The Powercolor X1900 XT can hardly be classified as cheap, but you could spend a lot more money. The downside of buying a performance card from ATI these days is the excessive amount of noise that some of them produce. Nvidia has managed to get around this problem by using a different cooler design, although you could always get a third-party cooler from someone like Arctic Cooling, but ATI's board partners, Powercolor included, should really consider using them as standard. At least it's not too bad until you fire up a 3D-intensive game.

The PowerColor X1900 XT's core is clocked at 625MHz, while its memory runs at an effective 1450MHz. That's 25MHz and 100MHz lower than the XTX's core and memory clock speeds, both of which are within reach of the XT if you're brave enough to overclock your graphics card. There really shouldn't be any need to do so, at least not if the benchmark numbers this card produced are anything to go by. Judging from our overclocking adventures with the Sapphire Blizzard card, another Radeon X1900 XT-based card, it seems like you can push the latest ATI GPUs quite hard.

It's also worth taking into consideration that the latest high-end cards from both ATI and Nvidia are quite long, so if you have a small case, or inward-facing hard drives, you might have some problems fitting these cards. You'd also do well to upgrade your power supply to a model with a built-in PCI Express power connector, as using the supplied power splitter isn't ideal. These cards draw quite a lot of power, and having an under-powered PSU isn't a good idea, potentially causing problems throughout your entire system.

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