Feeds

Trojan intercepts bank tokens

TAN marks exposed

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

A newly discovered Trojan is intercepting the TAN codes used as security tokens by customers of two major German banks, Postbank and Deutsche Bank, according to anti-virus experts.

Until now, TAN codes were pretty safe, in particular against phishing attacks, as these tokens are sent either through (snail) mail or by SMS. Phishing scammers would not only have to know a customer's login details and password to enter an online bank account, but also the token to enable transactions. For this reason, many European banks have adopted the system for online banking.

Trojan-Spy.Win32.Bancos.pw is changing the security landscape once again, as it is able to intercept HTTPS traffic and obtain the security token pass code. When the customer tries to enter a TAN code, an error message appears. Phishing scammers, if they are quick enough, can then enter the code themselves.

The Trojan isn't widespread yet, nor have there been any reports of victims, "but there is no doubt we are going to see more of this", an expert warns. "It could render the use of tokens useless." ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?