Feeds

Three Samsung DRAMers prepare for life behind bars

A dirty dozen

Top three mobile application threats

The memory cartel saga continued today with three Samsung Electronics executives agreeing to go to the slammer and make amends for fixing DRAM prices.

Senior manager of DRAM sales Sun Woo Lee will serve eight months, while two lower level DRAM staffers Yeongho Kang and Young Woo Lee will serve seven months. All three have plead guilty to participating in a conspiracy to fix the prices of DRAM. All told, four companies - Hynix, Infineon, Elpida and Samsung - have been caught up in the memory scandal and paid $731m in fines.

“True deterrence occurs when guilty individuals serve jail terms, and not just when corporations pay criminal fines,” said US Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. “These pleas should send a clear message that we will hold accountable all conspirators, whether domestic or foreign, that harm American consumers through their illegal conduct.”

The actions of the memory makers affected the likes of Dell, HP, Compaq, IBM, Gateway, Apple and their customers.

The Samsung executives join nine other executives at various companies who have been charged in the memory ordeal. The Samsung staffers will each pay a $250,000 fine in addition to going to the clink.

The US government has built a case showing that the memory makers held meetings from 1999 to 2002 in which they worked to set common prices for DRAM. During this period, PC maker executives such as Michael Dell accused the companies of acting like a cartel.

The US Department of Justice warned that its still in pursuit of people involved in the memory scandal.

“These are the first executives from Samsung to plead guilty to fixing prices in what is still an active investigation into antitrust violations in the DRAM industry,” said Thomas O. Barnett, Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Department’s Antitrust Division. “We will continue our efforts to bring to justice other domestic and foreign-based executives who were involved with fixing DRAM prices.” ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!
Grim diversity numbers dumped alongside Facebook earnings
Microsoft: We're making ONE TRUE WINDOWS to rule us all
Enterprise, Windows still power firm's shaky money-maker
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.