Feeds

40,000 BP workers exposed in Ernst & Young laptop loss

Sun, IBM and Cisco welcome BP to club

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Exclusive Like sands through the hourglass, these are The Days of Ernst & Young laptop loss. Yes, friends, The Register can confirm that BP has been added to the list of Ernst & Young customers whose personal data has been exposed after a laptop theft. BP joins Sun Microsystems, Cisco and IBM in this not so exclusive club.

Ernst & Young has sent out a letter to all 38,000 BP employees in the US, telling them that a laptop theft had exposed their names and social security numbers. To keep the BP staff's mind at ease, Ernst & Young said that the file name containing their info did not indicate what type of information was on the laptop, and the laptop was password protected. Phew!

Ernst & Young confirmed that this is the very same laptop that held data on the Sun, Cisco and IBM workers. All of these data losses were revealed by us in a set of exclusive stories. Ernst & Young also recently lost four more laptops in Miami, although it has not said which customers were affected in those incidents.

Oddly, the Ernst & Young saga has gone untouched by other media outlets. That's somewhat surprising given the vigor with which security reporters chased down our initial confirmation yesterday that a Fidelity Investments laptop loss had exposed the personal information of 200,000 HP employees.

Ernst & Young continues to maintain a code of silence around the laptop thefts, saying only that the BP/Sun/IBM/Cisco machine was password protected. This speak no evil policy has resulted in a string of stories as Ernst & Young customers are told one by one about the theft.

It's difficult to obtain an exact figure on how many people have been affected by Ernst & Young's security lapse given that it won't say anything on the subject. We do, however, know that the IBM data breach exposed all current and former employees who have worked overseas at some point in their career. So, we're likely talking well over 100,000 people in that one incident.

You have to wonder how long these thefts can continue before the financial services companies start explaining why key customer data was sitting on laptops and why workers felt it okay to leave these laptops in their cars or in conference rooms. The lack of action on their part will no doubt encourage legislators to step in at some point.

Keep your letters coming. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Why did it take antivirus giants YEARS to drill into super-scary Regin? Symantec responds...
FYI this isn't just going to target Windows, Linux and OS X fans
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
Home Office: Fancy flogging us some SECRET SPY GEAR?
If you do, tell NOBODY what it's for or how it works
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.