Feeds

Clara.net boss blasts 'ridiculous' publishing laws

'Tube geek' case exasperation

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Clara.net managing director Steve Rawlinson has branded existing laws which hold ISPs responsible for content they host as "ridiculous". Speaking to the Register about the case of "Tube geek" Geoff Marshall's blog - hosted by Clara.net and the subject of legal wranglings with Transport for London - Rawlinson reluctantly advised people to "host their sites outside the UK".

Rawlinson said companies were increasingly going after ISPs rather than individuals who publish content they do not like. Rawlinson said: "It is plainly ridiculous. We are held responsible but we cannot make a qualified legal decision on every complaint we receive. We have three staff looking at complaints. I'd like to see customers responsible for what they publish - and I think they would like that too."

He said: "As the law stands all I can do is advise people to host their sites outside the UK - and you can imagine how much I enjoy that."

Rawlinson said the problem was getting worse. He cited a case of two old ladies who both had websites selling budgerigars - each accused the other of stealing bits of content and eventually both their ISPs removed the sites.

Marshall was warned that some material on his website was copyrighted. He was also told to stop linking to other sites which allegedly contained copyright material.

Rawlinson said the case for linking to defamatory material came from the 1890s when a man in a dispute with a shop stood in the street outside and pointed up at a sign which was defamatory. Although it was never proved if he made the sign, he was found guilty by reason of pointing at it. He was unaware of it being used to go after copyrighted material.

Marshall's main complaint is that Transport for London's own website contains links to sites which contain copyright images very similar to those which were on Marshall's site.

We still haven't heard back from Transport for London.

Marshall's website is here.®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Right to be forgotten should apply to Google.com too: EU
And hey - no need to tell the website you've de-listed. That'll make it easier ...
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
prev story

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Simplify SSL certificate management across the enterprise
Simple steps to take control of SSL across the enterprise, and recommendations for a management platform for full visibility and single-point of control for these Certificates.