Feeds

Judge upholds PlayStation controller ruling

Sony's witness not credible, judge says

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Sony Computer Entertainment has lost the latest round in a patent case over a vibrating PlayStation controller, after a Judge refused to accept an argument that Immersion Corporation, the patent owner, had tried to hide crucial information.

According to reports, Judge Claudia Wilken of the US Court for the Northern District of California did not find Sony’s witness, Craig Thorner, to be credible.

The case dates back to 2002 when Immersion, a developer and licensor of what is known as haptic feedback technology, which can be used to make joysticks vibrate in synch with on-screen events, sued Sony, alleging that the PlayStation, PlayStation 2, and associated controllers, accessories and software games that include touch feedback, infringed on two of Immersion's patents.

In September 2004 a jury found in favour of the developer and awarded Immersion $82m in damages. In March 2005 the Court increased the award to $90.7m, to take account of interest due, and issued a permanent injunction against the manufacture, use, sale, or import into the US of the infringing systems. The ban was then stayed pending an appeal.

Sony not only appealed that ruling to a Federal Circuit Court of Appeal, but also filed an appeal with the District Court arguing that Immersion had tried to hide discussions the company had held with inventor Craig Thorner. Thorner had previously developed technology similar to that covered by Immersion’s patents, throwing doubt on the validity of those patents.

But, according to reports, Judge Wilken was not happy with Thorner’s performance as a witness, finding that a payment of $150,000 made by Sony to Thorner was suspect, despite Sony’s explanation that it was an advance royalty payment.

She dismissed the appeal.

The appeal to the Federal Circuit is still ongoing.

Copyright © 2006, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?