Feeds

BT secures Welsh broadband deal

£13m pays for final 35 exchanges to get DSL

Business security measures using SSL

Millions of pounds are to be spent converting the last 35 BT exchanges in Wales to broadband in a move to deliver blanket broadband coverage throughout the Principality.

The Welsh Assembly has just inked a deal with BT to convert the last exchanges in Wales are to be wired for broadband - so a further 10,000 homes and business can hook up to high speed net access. These exchanges, not already converted to DSL because they were deemed not to be commercially viable, are due to come online in the summer.

Welsh Assembly Government e-minister Andrew Davies said: "Currently, around 99 per cent of the Welsh population can access broadband technology...however, the Assembly Government is committed to ensuring that virtually every single individual and business in Wales has the opportunity to benefit from the advantages offered by this technology.

"Today's announcement will lead to further growth in broadband uptake as these final unviable exchange areas are enabled."

BT is understood to be footing around a third of the cost of the bill, believed to be as much as £13m, with the rest coming from taxpayers. But even with all of BT's exchanges broadband-enabled, there will still be plenty of areas within Wales unable to secure affordable broadband access.

Which is why once these exchanges are up and running, officials intend to identify broadband blackspots to see what other technologies can be deployed to deliver high speed services.

Last month, for example, the European Commission (EC) gave the go-ahead for plans by the Welsh Development Agency (WDA) to wire up 14 Welsh business parks in North Wales with broadband, previously unconnected due to their remote locations. But thanks to a scheme called "FibreSpeed Wales", the WDA is looking to hire a wholesale operator to construct an open, carrier-neutral, fibre-optic network linking all 14 business parks.

Although the EC has agreed that such a project would not breach state aid rules, a final decision on whether the project can proceed is likely to be made later this year. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.