Feeds

Star Wars TV spin-off aims for 100 episodes

Jumping the shark

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Producers of a TV spin-off of the Star Wars films reckon it will run for 100 episodes. Producer Rick McCallum told BBC Radio 1 that writing will shortly begin on the project, which will begin filming in 2008 ready for transmission in the same year.

The series is set between Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith and Star Wars IV: A New Hope and covers the early years of Luke Skywalker. So, unless the writers decide to rewrite the Star Wars story arc, expect lots of scenes of farming on the desert world of Tatooine. Or perhaps not. McCallum said the series would introduce new characters and be "much more dramatic and darker" than the films.

Which sounds a lot like the marketing blurb for Revenge of the Sith.

The TV series is likely to feature a different cast from the actors who played in the films. This, plus the fact the project will kick off after Star Wars creator George Lucas has finished with a third Indiana Jones sequel, make the Star Wars TV series sound like The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles.

Readers might be forgiven for thinking the project is inspired chiefly by the desire to extract more dosh from Star Wars fans than any artistic merit. Here's two reasons for thinking this for starters. The best film in the franchise, Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back, was coincidentally not directed by George Lucas who gave us a film based around a tax dispute, the risible Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace.

It may well be that the world is hungry for more space opera. In which case, we can't help but think that resurrecting Firefly might be a better option than further troubling Mr Lucas' accountants. Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith alone took £500m at the box office outside of the US, the BBC reports. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Criticism of Uber's journo-Data Analytics plan is an Attack on DIGITAL FREEDOM
First they came for Emil – and I'm damn well SPEAKING OUT
'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT
Plus: Anons are 'wannabes', KKK says, before being pwned
Google's whois results say it's a lousy smut searcher
Run whois google.com or whois microsoft.com. We dare you, you PIG◙◙◙◙ER
Holy vintage vehicles! Earliest known official Batmobile goes on sale
Riddle me this: are you prepared to pay US$180k?
'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?
Plus: Flame of the Week returns, for one night only!
NEWSFLASH: It's time to ditch dullard Facebook chums
Everything hot in tech, courtesy of avian anchor Regina Eggbert
Hey, you, PHONE-FACE! Kickstarter in-car mobe mount will EMBED your phone into your MUG
Stick it on the steering wheel and wait for the airbag to fire
prev story

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management
How using vulnerability assessments to identify exploitable weaknesses and take corrective action can reduce the risk of hackers finding your site and attacking it.