Feeds

UK drugs trial hospitalises six

Intensive care for 'seriously ill' men

Security for virtualized datacentres

Six drug trial volunteers who were given an anti-inflammatory drug at a private research unit based at London's Northwick Park Hospital are in intensive care after suffering a "reaction", the BBC reports.

The six were given TGN1412 - "designed to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and leukaemia" - on Monday. Within hours they were hospitalised after suffering "an inflammatory response which affects some organs of the body", as Northwick's intensive care director Ganesh Suntharalingam put it.

Suntharalingam explained that two of the men were in a critical condition, while the remainder were "serious but showing some signs of improvement".

The girlfriend of one of the men described her 28-year-old boyfriend's face as so swollen he "looks like the Elephant Man". Myfanwy Marshall told the BBC: "His friends cannot even face seeing him. I have to stay there because I'm looking beyond all the wires and the puffiness. This is not leukaemia, this is not pneumonia, this is not something they know how to deal with."

Parexel, the firm behind the trial, said it had followed guidelines and that such cases were extremely rare. The company's Professor Herman Scholtz said: "When the adverse drug reaction occurred, the Parexel clinical pharmacology medical team responded swiftly to stop the study procedures immediately."

The drug's German-based manufacturer, TeGenero, said the reactions were "completely unexpected and did not reflect results from initial laboratory studies".

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), meanwhile, immediately withdrew the trial's authorisation and issued an international warning against testing. Its inspectors have visited the unit and are consulting the local health authority, Department of Health and police with regard to the matter.

According to the BBC, the drug had already been tested on animals and cleared for human trials. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet
Probe prepares to make first landing on fast-moving rock
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.