Feeds

Mobile TV gets thumbs up

Trialists 'happy to pay' for the service

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Participants in pan-European trials of mobile television say they would gladly sign up for such a service and many would be prepared to pay for mobile TV.

These were some of the findings from a number of mobile phone pilot schemes run by Nokia in Finland, England, France and Spain. Each of the pilots involved a mobile operator and a TV content provider, which transmitted live digital TV to a Nokia 7710 handset.

Nearly 60 per cent of Finnish respondents thought the service would be very popular. Eight-three per cent of English respondents were happy with the service, compared to 75 per cent in Spain. Seventy-three per cent of the respondents in France said they would recommend the service to others. Although only 40 per cent of Finnish respondents were prepared to pay for the service, a clear majority of respondents from England, France and Spain were prepared to pay.

"These pilots are a vital component of the development of broadcast mobile TV, demonstrating consumer demand and business models for viable commercial services," Nokia senior vice president Ilkka Raiskinen said in a statement. "These pilots have proven to be very useful for all the different players in the mobile TV industry."

The most popular pricing model to emerge from the study is a monthly subscription for a package of channels. In the Helsinki pilot, half of those that took part thought €10 per month was a reasonable price to pay, while in France, 68 per cent were willing to pay &eur;7 per month for mobile TV services.

The studies also revealed a variation in the time people would be most interested in watching programmes on their handsets.

English viewers were most inclined to watch at midday, suggesting that viewers are enjoying their favourite TV content while on their lunch break. In Spain people were most inclined to watch TV during the early evening. In France, participants spread their viewing periods evenly between early evening, lunchtime and mid-evening.

The most popular types of content were news, sports, music, soaps and documentaries.

Copyright © 2006, ENN

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.