Feeds

National gun database backfires

New round of setbacks

Boost IT visibility and business value

Further delays have plagued the project to create the National Firearms Licensing Management System (NFLMS).

Two forces that have been piloting the database, Lancashire Police and the Metropolitan Police, will now have to run further tests. They have been forced to do so by the need to cleanse data so that information can be shared, and to configure different networks that have so far proved incompatible.

The next pilot involving the two forces is due to start in May 2006, to be followed by a nine month roll out across the country should it prove successful. A roll out schedule is yet to be agreed, but it is hoped the system will be installed across all forces by March next year.

"The forces operate on different systems, and it's not possible to mandate them to run off the same network," a spokesperson for the Police IT Organisation told Government Computing News. "We are now working on procedures to get around this issue."

Legislation for the database was in place almost 10 years ago, but the project has been repeatedly delayed due to difficulties in implementing the necessary standardised IT systems across 43 police forces.

Initially, the budget for the NFLMS was set at £5.5m, but following delays this has expanded by £1.5m.

Ministers have received much criticism for failing to set up the register. Ahead of the 10 year anniversary of the Dunblane shooting, the chief constable of Merseyside Police Bernard Hogan-Howe spoke out against the delay.

"I understand they've had two pilots and we're told that there are IT problems to actually resolving it but...this is too long," he said.

"We want it, there's certainly no resistance from the police service to have it and clearly what we do need is a register of all the people with a licence."

Prime minister Tony Blair promised parents of children killed in the Dunblane massacre that a national register would be created during their visit to Downing Street a decade ago.

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet logo

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Has Europe cut the UK adrift on data protection?
EU reckons we've one foot out the door anyway
Just TWO climate committee MPs contradict IPCC: The two with SCIENCE degrees
'Greenhouse effect is real, but as for the rest of it ...'
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Government's 'Google Review' copyright rules become law
Welcome in a New Era ... of copyright litigation
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.