Apple update fixes 'critical' security bug

Rumble in the jungle

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Apple released a security update on Wednesday that fixes multiple vulnerabilities, including a critical flaw in its Safari web browser that created a means for hackers to attack vulnerable systems.

The security bug meant malicious hackers could rename "safe file" extensions stored in ZIP archives, creating a way to trick users into executing malicious shell scripts. The flaw meant malicious applications could appear as a safe file type. If Mac users had left the "Open safe files after downloading" option enabled in Safari then malware would automatically be executed as soon as a user was tricked into visiting a malicious-constructed website. Security researchers produced a proof of concept demo to validate their concerns about the critical flaw.

Apple's update tackles the issue by performing additional download validation so that the user is warned (in Mac OS X v10.4.5) or downloads are not automatically opened (in Mac OS X v10.3.9). The update also addresses 19 other security bugs in Mac OS X involving security flaws in Safari, the PHP Apache module and scripting environment as well as Mail and iChat security bugs, as summarised by Secunia here.

The appearance of the Safari bug, along with a brace of low to no risk worms affecting Mac OS X, spawned a lively debate between Mac fans and security vendors over the impact of the security flap, which disinterested observers judged to be largely academic. ®

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