Feeds

Shy HP Superdomes arrive without the full Monte

Let's talk chipsets

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Intel has put HP in the rather awkward position of launching its new line of high-end Itanium servers without the new chip they were designed to accommodate.

HP will begin hawking a fresh set of Superdome Unix boxes in March. At first, this gear will ship with the new HP designed chipset - code-named Arches - and Intel's current version of Itanic - Madison. When Intel gets around to shipping the dual-core Montecito chip sometime later this year, HP customers will finally have access to the processor meant for their boxes. In addition, they'll have technology comparable to that currently offered by IBM and Sun Microsystems.

Not surprisingly, HP pitched the benefits of moving to the new gear now and urged customers to take advantage of the performance improvements shown with the revamped server hardware itself.

New processor be damned! Our chipset rocks!

"A lot are in need of more bandwidth and less latency. There's no reason why you should wait," HP's Itanium boss Rich Marcello told CNET, which got the scoop on the upcoming HP gear.

Of course, Intel and HP have spent years training customers to wait with Itanium whether you look at the initial release of Merced, software porting, signs of sales improvement or more recently the arrival of dual-core chips. Analyst firm powerhouse IDC, however, maintains that solid marketing by the likes of SGI, Bull and Unisys will finally put Itanic on the fast track - or at least the fast track to sales way below previous expectations.

Along with the upcoming Superdome gear, HP has been talking up a chipset code-named Windjammer that will slot into servers running on Intel's multicore version of Itanium code-named Tukwila that is due out in 2008. HP user groups have been all abuzz about this chipset since 2003.

While HP puts a decent spin on the Montecito delay, insiders are actually quite upset about it. One well-placed staffer voiced his displeasure to El Reg saying, "Intel screwed us." Given that perspective, we'll see if HP customers agree about the waiting game. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.