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Kingston pulls plug on IPTV service

Neither tuned in nor turned on

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Kingston Communications, the Hull-based telco, is pulling the plug on its broadband TV service because not enough people watch it. Launched in 2000, Kingston Interactive TV (KIT) offered dozens of channels via a set-top box and an ADSL connection.

At its height KIT Digital TV boasted 10,000 subscribers, but today only has about 4,000 punters. Existing customers have already been told the service will close from 3 April.

In a statement, the telco said: "Without the benefits of scale, further investment in the KIT service would not be cost-effective, and due to increased competition in the Digital TV market, it is not viable to continue the service as it currently exists.

"We have written to all of our KIT customers to provide them with more information about the closure and alternative options for receiving Digital TV."

The demise of KIT comes as BT is gearing up for the launch of its nationwide IPTV service later this year. It announced today that the Cartoon Network has become the latest content provider to sign up for the service. ®

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