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Logitech Wireless Headphones for iPod

Bluteooth ends tangled earphone cable misery?

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Review Logitech's wireless headphone set is more iPod-specific than the company's Wireless Music System (WMS), which Reg Hardware reviewed last week, though the underlying technology is the same: Bluetooth with its optional Advanced Audio Distribution Profile (A2DP) protocol to allow stereo music to be beamed from a compact transmitter to the 'phones...

logitech wireless headphones for ipod

This time round, Logitech ships a version of its plug-on transmitter with an integrated remote-control connector slot. Beyond that it's the same unit as before: there's a built-in rechargeable battery fed by a proprietary connector, and the same slider mechanism that allows you to place the 3.5mm earphone jack centrally or out to the edge of the box, the better to match the position of the 'phones socket on your iPod.

There's the same battery preserving auto-shutdown feature that kicks in when the transmitter notices no electrical activity on the 3.5mm jack. And, alas, the same tiny connect button that so soft that half the time you're not sure you're pressing it.

The presence of the remote control connector limits the product to iPod Minis, and third and fourth-generation iPods and their derivatives. Actually, you can fit it directly to a Nano or a Shuffle too, but they end up at right-angles to the transmitter so it's not exactly an ideal marriage. Logitech bundles a short, 23cm (9in) 3.5mm jack extension cable so you can connect the transmitter to other MP3 players and iPods. And, let's face it, since wireless means you can tuck the player and transmitter out of sight in a bag or pocket, it doesn't matter what the coupling looks like, only how well it works.

However, using anything other than the chosen iPods - and that includes a TV, DVD player, hi-fi amplifier, PlayStation, Xbox, whatever - you won't get to control playback. I don't know about you, but when I'm out and about, I find I spend far more time adjusting the volume - which you can control not matter what your music source - than I do skipping tracks and pausing, so not having the other controls wouldn't bother me much.

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