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Logitech Wireless Music System for iPod

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Review Logitech may be keen to associate its Wireless Music System (WMS) with Apple's ubiquitous digital music player, but the fact is it will happily work with any brand of MP3 player, with a Mac, with a PC and even with a transistor radio if it's got a spare 3.5mm headphone socket. Whatever you connect WMS' compact transmitter to, it will beam to the receiver unit placed anywhere up to 10m away...

logitech wireless music system for iPod

This makes for some interesting usages. The obvious one is to link the computer in one room to the hi-fi in another, in much the same way Apple's Wi-Fi based Airport Express box does. More interestingly - and this is the one Logitech is pushing - is to plug one onto your iPod, Creative Zen Vision:M, iRiver T30 or whatever and turn it into a remote control. The bizarre thing: your remote is also your music store. Weird, huh?

Unlike Airport Express, WMS' underlying technology is Bluetooth - version 1.2 in this case, with some clever technology added to the mix to allow it to carry stereo sound. And unlike comparable iPod-oriented products like Griffin's iTrip, which sends songs out on FM frequencies, WMS is legal in the UK.

WMS' transmitter module looks like an early iTrip. It's a shiny white box measuring 5.9 x 3.2 x 1.8cm and sporting a 3.5mm earphone jack. The jack's on a slider, so you can move it from the centre of the transmitter to the outer edge, the better to position it symmetrically on your MP3 player wherever the earphone socket it situated. Next to the jack is a tiny reset button. On one side is the port you connect the bundled battery charger to - the receiver has its own, non-removable rechargeable power cell inside - and on the other is a small connect button and status light.

The receiver is a little larger - 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.9-2.6cm - and has an external antenna which folds up from the back of the unit. The aerial is mounted alongside a 3.5mm earphone socket, left and right stereo RCA connectors and the receiver's own power port.

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