Feeds
90%

Logitech Wireless Music System for iPod

Music streaming made easy?

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Review Logitech may be keen to associate its Wireless Music System (WMS) with Apple's ubiquitous digital music player, but the fact is it will happily work with any brand of MP3 player, with a Mac, with a PC and even with a transistor radio if it's got a spare 3.5mm headphone socket. Whatever you connect WMS' compact transmitter to, it will beam to the receiver unit placed anywhere up to 10m away...

logitech wireless music system for iPod

This makes for some interesting usages. The obvious one is to link the computer in one room to the hi-fi in another, in much the same way Apple's Wi-Fi based Airport Express box does. More interestingly - and this is the one Logitech is pushing - is to plug one onto your iPod, Creative Zen Vision:M, iRiver T30 or whatever and turn it into a remote control. The bizarre thing: your remote is also your music store. Weird, huh?

Unlike Airport Express, WMS' underlying technology is Bluetooth - version 1.2 in this case, with some clever technology added to the mix to allow it to carry stereo sound. And unlike comparable iPod-oriented products like Griffin's iTrip, which sends songs out on FM frequencies, WMS is legal in the UK.

WMS' transmitter module looks like an early iTrip. It's a shiny white box measuring 5.9 x 3.2 x 1.8cm and sporting a 3.5mm earphone jack. The jack's on a slider, so you can move it from the centre of the transmitter to the outer edge, the better to position it symmetrically on your MP3 player wherever the earphone socket it situated. Next to the jack is a tiny reset button. On one side is the port you connect the bundled battery charger to - the receiver has its own, non-removable rechargeable power cell inside - and on the other is a small connect button and status light.

The receiver is a little larger - 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.9-2.6cm - and has an external antenna which folds up from the back of the unit. The aerial is mounted alongside a 3.5mm earphone socket, left and right stereo RCA connectors and the receiver's own power port.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.