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Colorado prepares for wealthy, migratory Itanium workers

'Hey, sweetheart. You heard of EPIC?'

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Prepare yourself, ladies of Fort Collins, Colorado. Some wealthy Itanium processor engineers are coming to town.

Intel looks to beef up its Fort Collins operations over the next five years by adding a "significant number" of engineers - particularly those of the Itanic variety, according to a report in the North Forty News. These Intel staffers will pull in close to $90,000 on average, while most plebs in the area earn a measly $33,550.

And the Average Joes ain't getting any richer with Intel in town, as a result of an unusual tax break tossed to the wealthy chip giant by Larimer County officials. Intel will be excused from paying close to $83,000 in taxes during the first five years of a 10 year, $20m project. The remaining savings will be calculated over time.

In addition, "[t]he Intel tax break could cost average homeowners from 36 to 38 cents a year, should the commissioners agree to increase property taxes to recover the lost revenues as they are permitted. But they showed little interest in doing so," the paper reported.

The Intel chip design center in Fort Collins employs about 350 staff. ®

Bootnote

Intel is expected to make its final decision on which outside PR firm it will hire to help out with brain-washing work. Up until now, Intel stood as a rarity for a company its size by doing almost all PR work inhouse. In our experience, Intel has the best PR team in the business. We can't imagine why it would think hiring an outside firm - a practice many journalists despise - is a good idea. Good bye beloved efficiency.

Eric Kim, the marketing SVP Intel poached from Samsung, is behind the PR move and Intel's recent branding changes. Let's all hope that this man - who spent millions to find out that the lowered "e" in Intel's logo bothered some people as an imperfection - knows what he's doing. Some pretty smart folks came up with the integrated electronics brand.

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