Feeds

20,000 videos available for PSP, iPod

Videos anywhere, any time

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More than 20,000 independently produced, user-published videos are now available to be pushed to Sony's PSP portable videogame console and Apple's iPod. They're from Veoh Networks, which claims to be "the first internet television peercasting network".

Veoh automatically downloads videos of interest to a PSP owner's device each time the PSP is connected to a user's PC.

In recent months the rush to make video entertainment available on the net has increased. The demand has accelerated because of the popularity of products like the Sony PSP that can be connected to the net and are capable of storing and playing high-quality videos. Many of these, such as the PSP and Apple's video iPod, are portable.

Veoh's peercasting network distributes TV-quality, full-screen video to be played on a PC or Mac or on a variety of new portable devices. The company says thousands of iPod owners are already filling their players with thousands of videos available through Veoh. It claims that from music videos and comedy sketches to how-to sessions and all things automotive, PSP and iPod enthusiasts will find compelling content from Veoh.

"Portable video is a hot topic for consumers, with many devices introduced and lauded earlier this month at the Consumer Electronics Show. Consumers clearly want to see their content when and where they choose," Veoh Network CEO Dmitry Shapiro said. "Veoh is designed to support the many viewing choices consumers need, including the living room TV, their laptop and portable video devices. Our network allows anyone to publish TV-quality video that can be watched everywhere."

Veoh integrates with the Sony PSP Media Manager, sold separately through Sony, allowing easy export of videos from the Veoh network to a person's PSP. Veoh's peer-to-peer distribution technology, unlike streaming video, gives portable device owners a place to discover high-grade video they can watch wherever they are.

Veoh software can be installed on a PC or Mac to create a virtual television network. That allows video bloggers and independent producers, as well as film studios and TV networks, to distribute TVquality, full-screen video to hundreds of millions of users with broadband connections. Producers can publish unlimited amounts of TV-grade video content to the network, providing consumers with unparalleled choice in television programming and control over their viewing experience.

Unlike rogue P2P networks that are used to share mostly pirated video, Veoh is a community of publishers and consumers, where published content is approved by editors, and consumers are assured they get what they request. The system also integrates tightly with RSS, providing content producers with easy publishing to multiple video systems.

Meanwhile, Viacom says it has signed an agreement with Apple to make some of its TV series' available through Apple's iTunes online store from MTV, MTV2, Comedy Central and Nickelodeon at $1.99 per episode.

Copyright © 2006, Faultline

Faultline is published by Rethink Research, a London-based publishing and consulting firm. This weekly newsletter is an assessment of the impact of the week's events in the world of digital media. Faultline is where media meets technology. Subscription details here.

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display
Shaves price, not screen on mid-2014 model
iPhone 6 flip tip slips in Aussie's clip: Apple's 'reversible USB' leaks
New plug not compatible with official Type-C, according to fresh rumors
FEAST YOUR EYES: Samsung's Galaxy Alpha has an 'entirely new appearance'
Wow, it looks like nothing else on the market, for sure
YES YES YES! Apple patents mousy, pressure-sensing iVibrator
Fanbois prepare to experience the great Cupertin-O
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
Things are looking up in Flappy Bird sequel
'Swing Copters' offers the same gameplay but in a different direction
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.