Feeds
90%
Neuros MPEG 4 Recorder 2

Neuros MPEG 4 Recorder 2

The no-frills PVR is revamped for the PSP and iPod

The essential guide to IT transformation

Review The first incarnation of Neuros' MPEG 4 Recorder proved a handy tool for getting video onto a PDA without having to leave your computer on overnight while it churned through complex re-encoding algorithms. However, it didn't quite hack it as a no-frills PVR, lacking support for the higher resolutions you need for decent playback on a TV, and the ability to program a recording schedule. Neuros is one of those rare companies that not only takes such criticism on board but does something about it, and in this case promptly tweaked the product and re-released it as the Recorder 2...

Neuros MPEG 4 Recorder 2

The look and feel of the unit is the same, but scenting the opportunity provided by Sony's PlayStation Portable, Neuros has dropped the original Recorder's SD card support in favour of a MemoryStick Pro Duo slot. There's a CompactFlash slot too - as before - and Crucial Technology kindly lent Reg Hardware a 4GB card to equip the Recorder 2 with some storage capacity.

The two memory card slots are situated at the front of the device. Round the back are two 3.5mm stereo jacks: one a video input port, the other for video output. There's a power connector too. A flat plastic panel is all that survives of the original recorder's USB 2.0 port, now lost but ironically more useful than before. Neuros is also pitching the device at owners of the fifth-generation, video-playing iPod. Since the Apple machine (unlike the PSP), lacks a memory card slot of its own, recordings have to come via a PC or Mac. Macs certainly don't, and not all PCs provide a memory card slot, so by ditching the Recorder's USB port, Neuros is forcing a lot of folk to buy an external card reader. Once again, Crucial came to my rescue with a dandy-yet-cheap plug-in CF reader.

With the 4GB Crucial CF card installed, I hooked the Recorder 2 up to my DVD player and - since my TV lacks RCA composite-video and audio jacks - my VCR with the two bundled cables. Turning the Recorder 2 on, I found that not only has Neuros bundled a better remote control with it, but it's improved the on-screen interface too.

Neuros MPEG 4 Recorder 2

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?