Feeds

Apple to 'drop 1GB iPod Shuffle'

Red 1GB Nano on the way?

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Apple's failure to match pre-Macworld speculation and announce a revised iPod Shuffle could have sounded the screen-less music player's death knell. Its replacement, suggests UBS Investment Research analyst Ben Reitzes, will be a 1GB iPod Nano.

Suggestions that Apple is pondering a 1GB Nano were made in December 2005 as 1GB Shuffles became as hard for pre-Christmas buyers to lay their hands on than rocking-horse dung. A note on Apple's website saying the device wouldn't be back in stock until mid-January 2006 indicated to many observers that either the mooted redesign was in the works - or it was for the chop.

Well, it's back, available in its original form and ready to ship in 24 hours, says Apple. However, according to Reitzes, cited by AppleInsider, Apple is "getting set to 'end of life' the Shuffle".

Will a 1GB Nano replace it? That depends on how the lack of 1GB Shuffles played out, we suspect. If it drove buyers to choose the more expensive 2GB Nano instead, there's little need to fill out the line with a, say, $150 1GB Nano. If buyers took the cheaper option, then it may well make sense to launch something only slightly more expensive than the $129 1GB Shuffle but with the clear benefits of a screen and the classic iPod look, something like a 1GB Nano.

There's actually room for both. The gap between the $199 Apple wants for the 2GB Nano and the price of the 1GB Shuffle is calling out to be filled with a higher capacity Shuffle or a lower capacity Nano, ideally the latter. Inventory management difficulties apart, it makes sense to bring the ranges closer together to attract buyers who feel a screen is essential but don't want to pay $199 for it.

Perhaps Apple will use the opportunity to cash in on claims it's preparing a red iPod - made by U2's Bono, allegedly - to raise awareness of Aids in Africa... Imagine it, a 1GB, 'limited edition' red Nano. How will that fly off the shelves? ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Reg man builds smart home rig, gains SUPREME CONTROL of DOMAIN – Pics
LightwaveRF and Arduino: Bright ideas for dim DIYers
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
Apple patent LOCKS drivers out of their OWN PHONES
I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't let you text that
Microsoft signs Motorola to Android patent pact – no, not THAT Motorola
The part that Google never got will play ball with Redmond
Slip your finger in this ring and unlock your backdoor, phone, etc
Take a look at this new NFC jewellery – why, what were you thinking of?
Happy 25th birthday, Game Boy!
Monochrome handset ushered in modern mobile gaming era
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code
Slow and kludgy rollout will protect corporate profits
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.