Feeds

Macally readies iPod Nano dockable headphones

Plug and play

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Don't want to carry your iPod Nano in a pocket or around your neck? Then how about carrying it on your head? Accessory maker MacAlly has announced a set of cordless headphones that incorporate their own iPod Nano dock.

Like Macally's older Shuffle-connectable headphones, the mTune-N's right speaker sports a slot for the music player. The Nano's clickwheel controls are accessible through a circular hole cut into the side of the slot.

The mTune-N's chunky leather-padded 4cm-cone speakers provide "exceptional" stereo sound, Macally says. They weigh 173g (6.1oz) - but you can add 43g (1.5oz) to that when you plug in the Nano. While the 'phones will only dock with the Nano, they can be connected to any other iPod, MP3 player, computer, TV or hi-fi the conventional way: there's a 3.5mm stereo jack socket into which you can plug a standard cable to link the two devices together.

The mTune-N is due to ship mid-February for around £40 in the UK and $50 in the US. ®

Macally mTune-N iPod Nano headphones

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?