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Intel ships 1m 65nm dual-core chips

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Intel has shipped more than one million 65nm dual-core processors, the chip giant announced today.

That figure comprises all the Core Duo chips, 'Presler' Pentium D 9xx parts and the Pentium Extreme Edition 955 that have gone out to makers of notebook and desktop PCs, not to mention the products Apple's using in its latest iMac and upcoming MacBook Pro.

Intel is currently punching out 65nm chips at two 300mm-wafer fabs: D1D in Hillsboro and Oregon and Fab 12 in Chandler, Arizona. Two further facilities will be producing 65bn chips in volume by the end of the year, Intel director of process architecture and integration Mark Bohr said.

The chip maker re-iterated its forecast that it will begin shipping more 65nm parts than 90nm ones during Q3.

Intel started shipping 65nm chips late 2005 ahead of the product's formal introduction early this year. ®

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