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Selfridges to sell pricey iPod lessons

They're free round the corner at the Apple shop

Posh London department store Selfridges is to begin charging punters £65 for a 40-minute one-on-one iPod tutorial later this month - almost as much as it costs to buy the cheapest iPod.

According to an Agence France-Presse report, the store's "iPod Survival" lessons can be taken at home or in the store. The session covers basic iTunes and iPod usage, inlcuding setting up playlists, transferring songs and videos, and downloading podcasts.

Selfridges said the service had been developed in response to customer demand for more help with their trendy MP3 players, especially from older buyers.

However, equally baffled but more cost-conscious consumers are already availing themselves of the free iPod courses Apple itself runs in its Regent Street store, about 15 minutes' walk from Selfridges' Oxford Street site.

Selfridges set up a music transfer service, SpeedPod, in December 2005. The store will rip CDs for £2.50 a pop. iPod owners unwilling to bring their discs in themselves can pay £5 to have them couriered to the shop and back - or for free if they want 40 or more CDs transferred. ®

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