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Intel readies 65nm Celeron D CPUs

Faster Presler and Cedar Mills, too

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Exclusive Intel's first 65nm desktop Celeron D chips will be the 352 and 356, The Register has learned.

Based on 'Cedar Mill', the 65nm single-core chip that's the basis for the newly launched Pentium 4 6x1 series, the new Celerons will provide 512KB of L2 cache, double that of current Celeron D family members. However, like the existing 'Prescott'-based Celeron Ds, the new models will run across 533MHz frontside bus and support 64-bit computing.

The Celerons, revealed in recent internal retail-oriented documentation seen by The Register, will be accompanied by a further 'Cedar Mill'-based P4, the 671, clocked at 3.8GHz like the current Prescott-based 670 and 672. Like the others, the 671 will support HyperThreading, but it lacks the 672's Virtualisation Technology support.

The 671, like the already-launched other members of the 6x1 series, will provide Intel's Extended SpeedStep Technology (EIST), but not until Q2.

Finally, the near-term roadmap also features the Pentium D 960, which will take the 65nm dual-core desktop line to 3.6GHz. Again, EIST-enabled versions of the 9x0 series may not ship until Q2. ®

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