Feeds

Scammers offer defunct MS mag to developers

Dead stupid

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

Fraudsters are attempting to sell subscriptions to a defunct magazine in a lame attempt to defraud Microsoft developers.

Software developers in the US have been receiving offers through the post to "subscribe" to the Microsoft Systems Journal (MSJ) for a "cut-price" $50 a year. But the programming journal, which began life in 1986 and ran up until merging with Microsoft Internet Developer magazine in 2000 to create the current MSDN magazine, is now defunct and the offer is nothing more than a scam. Prospective marks were invited to send payment to a rented mailbox in a Mailboxes Etc. store in a Kentucky shopping mall.

Stephen Toub, technical editor at MSDN, warned about the scam in a blog entry after being contacted by readers who'd received the bogus offer. “Recently, we at MSDN Magazine were contacted by several readers concerned about some mail they had received (USPS, not email). The mail was from a publishing house offering subscriptions to MSJ," he wrote. "If you receive one of these offerings, do not send these people money! MSJ is no longer being published."

It's unclear if anyone fell victim to the ruse, which was poorly conceived and unlikely to fool many. Magazine subscription scams are a common trick among US con-men. The Council of Better Business Bureaus received 4,964 complaints about magazine sales in 2004, a third (36 per cent) of which involved postal offers, Computerworld reports. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Attackers raid SWISS BANKS with DNS and malware bombs
'Retefe' trojan uses clever spin on old attacks to grant total control of bank accounts
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.