Feeds

Papa LSD makes the trip to 100

Hofmann has legions but no lesions

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Heroic comedian Bill Hicks once called for the news media to run a positive story on LSD consumption - a "Boy sees God and humanity's inner-beauty" piece meant to counter the "Boy jumps out of window and splatters" tales. We can come pretty close to achieving this goal by reporting that Albert Hofmann - the discoverer of LSD - has turned 100 today.

Far from having some grotesque tumor or a melting brain, Hofmann continues to plod along in smashing style. In fact, he's the celebrity guest at a LSD symposium being held this week in Basel and will give a talk. The conference was set up to match Hofmann's 100th birthday.

Hofmann's early research into lysergic acid led to the discovery of LSD-25 in 1938. It would, however, take another five years before Hoffman set out on the first voluntary LSD trip. At the fabled 4:20 pm, Hofmann put down a whopping 250 microgram dose of Lysergic acid diethylamide, started feeling a bit funky and set out for a bike ride - likely the most fantastic and odd ride anyone had yet to experience.

For quite some time, LSD was used as a scientific tool and thought to have particularly strong benefits in psychology.

As we all know though, the damn hippies got their hands on the acid and shocked the Normals with their "turn on, tune in" culture. It didn't take too long before the "Boy jumps out of window and splatters" stories started to outclass the feeling that LSD would deliver a higher consciousness to humankind or perhaps open a portal to aliens.

Hofmann continues to call for LSD to be embraced by scientists once again as a possible tool for helping with psychological problems.

Happy birthday, Albert. Our third eye thanks you. ®

Bootnote

It's surely no coincidence that Zane Kesey - the son of author Ken Kesey - has released word today of his intentions to restore "Furthur" - the Merry Pranksters' faithful bus. The elder Kesey and a crew that included Neal Cassady traveled around the US in the 1960s, draining LSD-spiked orange juice as "Furthur" hurtled along the highways.

Kesey, of course, volunteered to take part in a 1959 LSD study at Stanford University. The lab rats were given acid and then observed in a painfully clinical setting. This experience provided some of the inspiration for One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and we're all the better for it.

There's a well-timed story in The Guardian on LSD's artistic links as well.

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
Who wants to be there as history is made at the launch of our LOHAN space project?
Two places available in the chase plane above the desert
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.