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Nokia and Kyocera resolve patent dispute

They kept that one quiet

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Nokia and Kyocera have settled their differences over which of them owns what mobile phone intellectual property, thus resolving all pending litigation between them.

The pair today said they had agreed to license each other their respective patents. Crucially, Kyocera will pay Nokia a royalty covering technology used in its CDMA, PHS and PDC handsets and systems. Nokia also gains access to Kyocera's "essential patents", as well as supplemental intellectual property "relating to all standards and covering all Nokia mobile phone, module and infrastructure products" the mobile-phone giant today confirmed.

How much each company is paying to the other for all this wasn't made public.

Nokia and Kyocera began their dispute in February 2004, the two companies admitted. The story didn't break until the following October, when Kyocera claimed that 36 Nokia handsets were infringing three of its patents. The companies themselves have kept remarkably quiet about the matter - until now. ®

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