Feeds

Intel Macs stay at non-Intel prices

New iMacs come early

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Macworld Apple is shipping its first Intel-based Mac six months early and debuting its first Intel-based laptops. However, it seems that Intel technology does not herald Intel pricing.

CEO Steve Jobs opened Macworld in San Francisco by previewing the MacBook Pro, a machine that supersedes the PowerBook G4 and introduces 4-5x performance gains with the insertion of Intel's Core Duo processor.

Intel's dual-core chip delivers the extra performance without an increase in power consumption or heat - two issues Apple struggled with when contemplating the use of IBM's G5-class PowerPC chip in laptops.

Explaining the IBM-to-Intel switch, Jobs told whooping Macworld delegates: "We are kinda done with Power, and we want Mac in the name of our products." Orders for the MacBookPro are being taken now, and shipment is due next month.

"If you want one, I suggest you get your order in early," Jobs advised attendees.

Jobs, the consummate showman, also announced immediate availability of Apple's first Intel-based desktop machine, which the CEO had previously said wouldn't ship by June 2006. His forecast remains correct, but many Apple watchers had assumed it would take until that time to ship the new machines. Jobs and Intel's CEO Paul Otellini, dressed in Intel lab-engineer's white 'bunny suit', announced the Intel-based iMac desktop together.

Jobs claimed the iMac is 2-3 times faster than the PowerPC-based iMac G5 thanks to the 2GHz Intel dual-core chip formerly known as the Pentium M.

While Intel's dual-core processor will speed performance, it will not bring with it lower prices for Apple gear. Many Apple fans hoped the company would bring its pricing more in line with standard PCs after adopting the Intel engines.

Jobs boasted that the 17in and 20in iMacs feature the same familiar design, exterior features, iSight camera, Front Row and Apple remote software for the same price as today's iMac. Prices for the iMac start at $1299.

Pricing for the MacBook Pro also seems destined to remain unchanged. The planned 1.67GHz, 80GB and 512MB machine will kick-in at $1999 - the same price as today's 15in PowerBook - while the 1.83GHz, 1GB and 100GB MacBookPro will be priced $2499 - matching today's 17inch PowerBook G4. Full specs are available here.

Customers, thankfully, will be getting the addition of some new tweaks and features. The MacBookPro will feature an integrated camera above the screen that replaces the need for a separate iSight camera. The new machine also incorporates the latest ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 graphics chip, an ExpressCard slot - the PCI Express-based successor to PC Card/PCMCIA - and MagSafe, a magnetically attached power lead that snaps out safely if somebody accidentally walks into the lead.

"If the chord is yanked, it's pulled out. This is going to save us all a lot of hassle. Everything get yanked out. Nothing gets damaged," Jobs cooed.

Summing up the move to Intel, Jobs said the iMac and MacBook Pro are ushering in a "new generation of Macs based on Intel's latest and greatest technology". He re-committed Apple to transitioning all its products to Intel by the end of 2006. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?