Feeds

Becta reviews UK schools for Microsoft 'lock-in'

Value for money?

3 Big data security analytics techniques

The government agency leading implementation of the Department for Education and Skills' e-strategy has launched two reviews of schools' use of ICT.

The British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (Becta) last week announced a value for money review of Microsoft's educational licensing programme, and a second looking at ways of improving home ICT access for school pupils.

The first review will examine the impact of Microsoft's dominance of the UK education market and whether it represents value for money.

Becta said the review would pay particular attention to Microsoft's subscription licensing models and the risks associated with non-perpetual licences.

It will examine the total costs of exiting those licence agreements and the corresponding risks of 'lock-in'. If risks are found, the report will seek to identify mechanisms whereby schools and colleges could mitigate those risks and protect their investment.

Becta chief executive Owen Lynch said: "Becta has always recognised the importance of ensuring schools and colleges have access to a range of products and services which represent good value for money.

"In areas where a single supplier is dominant particular vigilance is necessary to guarantee that this happens and that schools do not find themselves inadvertently 'locked in' to a particular supplier via for example a licensing mechanism. Thus we have initiated a review."

The interim report is expected to be published in June 2006.

The agency's second review will look at software licensing and document interoperability issues in relation to home and school computer use.

It will analyse ways in which both pupils and parents can acquire the applications and licences necessary when working on the same document on either a home or school computer.

It will also address compatibility issues when a home computer runs different programmes to those used at school.

Lynch said: "This [review] is particularly important both in the context of addressing the digital divide and in the increasing number of circumstances where pupils and parents access information and resources online from schools."

The second review forms part of the DfES' e-strategy, under which it aims to open up school internet systems to pupils when they are working at home.

Copyright © eGov monitor Weekly

eGov monitor Weekly is a free e-newsletter covering developments in UK eGovernment and public sector IT over the last seven days. To register go here.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.