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Dell ridicules Microsoft as a 'so called' high-end gamer

Fire-breathing Renegade burns Xbox 360

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CES Dismissing Microsoft's Xbox 360 as "so called high-definition gaming," Michael Dell today unveiled a stunning new limited edition Dell gaming PC packed with four Nvidia graphics processors and a "factory over-clocked" 4.26GHz chip.

Chairman Dell did the unveiling here at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and managed to wow his keynote crowd with the flashy XPS 600 Renegade. The limited edition system boasts a custom red paint job with flame graphics along the side. Dell also believes the box, shipping in the first quarter, will be the first to hold two of Nvidia's GeForce 7800 SLI graphics cards, which would allow four graphics processors to be linked together. Add all that to the 4.26GHz Intel Extreme Edition dual-core chip, and you've got a serious gaming machine.

"Our product line is hotter than ever," Dell said.

We think he was referring to the impressive performance of the system and the flame graphics instead of Dell's dependence on Intel's scorching chips.

Time and again, Dell emphasized that Microsoft's Xbox may seem impressive at release, but the locked-down system will soon fail to compete against the ever-improving performance of PCs. This makes a Dell PC "much faster than any gaming console you can buy," Dell said.

Along with the new PC, Dell revealed a whopping 30-inch LCD monitor called the Widescreen UltraSharp 3007WFP flat-panel, which will start at $2,199. "The 3007WFP also offers comfort and convenience features such as a height-adjustable stand with tilt and swivel capabilities and an integrated 9-in-2 media card reader and four USB 2.0 ports for connecting devices such as digital cameras and printers," Dell corporate said.

Sticking with the big screen theme, Dell also showed a 17-inch notebook that runs on Intel's new Core Duo processors. The Inspiron E1705 starts at $2,299.

(You'll find more information on the new Dell gear here.)

For some reason, Dell kept insisting that his is the "only" company with the size, scale and innovative inclinations to produce such impressive gear. And here we thought that was meant to be HP or IBM. ®

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