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eBayer bids £1k for photo of 42in plasma

Auction pulled after Reg vigilante action

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Updated How much would you pay for a 42in Panasonic plasma TV worth more than £3,000? A thousand quid? It's an absolute snip down at eBay, where one lucky punter is about to secure himself said item at a never-to-repeated price:

42in plasma - too good to be true

Hold on a minute – that might not be quite the bargain we thought. Let's check the blurb:

The clue is in there

Yup. Sadly, it's the "photo of an Xbox 360" gag part two. Caveat emptor once again, although we very much doubt whether the highest current bidder will be inclined to part with his hard-earned cash when he realises he's been had. ®

Update

No sooner had this piece been published than Reg-reading vigilantes moved in for the kill. Here's how the bidding ended:

Gotcha!

Realising he'd been rumbled, the seller terminated the auction himself. He then sent us this explanatory email:

Hi,

I was the seller of this item, I had to bid on the item myself and end the listing early. the price was getting rediculous. There was no way that I was going to allow someone to pay £2000 for a picture. I couldnt live with myself with that. Also an ebay told me that I needed permision from panasonic to sell a picture of their item, which I did not know.

Other than the permision that I needed, there was nothing wrong with what I was selling as far as I can see. It was listed under home and garden: decorative items and there was also another note further down the listing that said 'note: you are bidding on a picture of the plasma being described and not the actual plasma itself'. And no where on the listing does it say that you the buyer is bidding on a plasma screen. Now as far as I can see, other than needing permission from panasonic there wasnt anything wrong with the listing. But if you know that there was then please tell me. I would be very gratefull to know.

I just thought id let you know that no one has been had.

thanks for your time,

james.

We're sure Reg readers can tell James what was wrong with the listing. In the meantime, justice has been done.

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