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'Sossaman' launches as 'low-voltage' Xeon DP

Intel debuts first dual-core Xeon DP too

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Intel has launched 'Sossaman', its low-power Xeon DP server processor based on its Pentium M mobile chip. The company has also added the first dual-core CPU to its Xeon DP line-up.

The launch of the dual-core Xeon DP follows the release of 'Paxville', the first dual-core Xeon MP part, in November 2005. The $1043 DP chip is clocked at 2.8GHz and contains two 2MB L2 caches. The part runs across an 800MHz frontside bus.

According to Intel's official price list, the part is fabbed at 90nm. However we suspect it's actually fabbed at 65nm. Certainly, 'Dempsey', the 65nm dual-core Xeon DP, is scheduled to ship in Q1 2006, Intel has said in the past.

Sossaman is believed to be a 65nm part, too, but it likewise is listed as a 90nm chip. It's down as the 3GHz "low voltage" Xeon, equipped with 2MB of L2 cache and 800MHz FSB support. The new 3.2GHz "mid-voltage" Xeon offers the same cache complement and FSB speed. The two CPUs are priced at $519 and $487, respectively - yes, that's right, the slower chip does cost more, but Intel is undoubtedly hoping for some major design wins with blade-server makers for the low-voltage part.

Intel also debuted a 90nm 2.8GHz 'E' Xeon at $193, expanding its line of Pentium 4 6xx-based Xeons down-market. ®

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