Feeds

ATI to add CrossFire to 'all' X1000 GPUs

Standard feature from now on

The essential guide to IT transformation

All of ATI's Radeon X1000-class graphics chips will support the company's multi-GPU technology, CrossFire, the company has revealed.

The move, announced yesterday by Edward Chou, ATI Asia-Pacific's marketing director, will presumably end the separation of the X1000 GPU lines into standard and "CrossFire Edition" cards.

Chou's comment comes on the heels of the release of X1600-based graphics cards, such as Club 3D's Radeon X1600 XT board, that support CrossFire but are not marked out as 'CrossFire Edition' products.

Chou said CrossFire cards will continue to be hosted by ATI's Radeon Xpress 200 chipsets and Intel's 975X chipset. The company, he said, has no plans to allow other chipset vendors to mark their products as CrossFire-compatible. VIA's K8T900 chipset is said to be capable of hosting CrossFire cards as well as the company's own RapidFire solution.

DigiTimes today claimed most of ATI's CrossFire-compatible GPUs have been sold to PC OEMs, according to Taiwanese motherboard-maker sources. Supplies for the channel are expected to ramp up through Q1 2006, it said. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?